Drawings

Ruin of an Abbey

$325.00

Attributed to Thomas Sandby. Unsigned, artist name and title on the back of the old mat. "Tintern Abbey" inscribed in pencil at the bottom of the drawing. A detailed drawing with lovely shading. Drawing measures 8 1/2 x 8 inches on 10 1/4 x 8 inch medium weight wove type paper. Thomas Sandby was a draughtsman, watercolor artist, architect, and teacher. He was one of the founding members of the Royal Academy in 1768, along with his younger brother Paul, and was its first professor of architecture.

The Blacksmith Shop

$325.00

This charcoal drawing by John(Jack)Fenton measures 10 x 14 inches and is pencil signed on the lower right corner. In this image, Fenton depicts local characters gathering at the blacksmith shop to catch up on daily events. Fenton was a native of New York and studied at Columbia University and the New York School of Art. He became a painter, illustrator and teacher with his works exhibited at the Art Institute of Chicago.

An Old Bridge

$295.00

This two sided drawing by Stephen Parrish measures 6 5/8 x 10 3/8 inches. Done in black ink, c. 1890, with a Maxfield Parrish Jr. family stamp on the lower right and upper left in black ink. Another drawing of a homestead with split rail fence, possibly his own, in on the reverse.

The Old Peep Toad Mill

$295.00

Watercolor on paper adhered to mat board, 8 x 10 1/4 inches, signed on the back and inscribed "Old Peep Toad Mill / North S[cit]uate, RI / Aug. 5, 1914." The town name is hard to make out, but there is an old Peep Toad Mill in East Killingly, Connecticut, not far from the Rhode Island state line. Hays had a studio in Providence, RI, and is known for painting bucolic subjects.

The Gathering Crowd

$275.00

This is an original ink drawing on paper, image size 6 7/8 x 11 inches, 1933, signed and dated in the lower right corner. Hopper Emory was born in Baltimore, Maryland and had a successful career in banking before he turned exclusively to his artwork. He traveled to England where he studied at the Heatherly School of Art in London, then returned to Maryland where he became known for his delicately rendered architectural and maritime etchings.

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