Otto Kuhler
1894-1976, German-American

River Landscape
1894-1976, German-American

Pencil signed in the lower right, "private proof" in the lower left. Plate measures 9 1/4 x 12 3/4 inches on 12 3/4 x 16 inch laid-type paper. C. 1930. This is a rare print and a rare subject for Kuhler, who is famous for his prints of trains and the industrial revolution.


Building Bridges
1894-1976, German-American

9 x 6 1/2 inches, printed on laid-type paper. Pencil signed in the lower right corner. C. 1924. Etching of the Point Bridge in Pittsburgh.


The Fast Mail
1894-1976, German-American

Pencil signed, printed in 1923. 6 x 8 inches on 9 3/4 x 12 3/4 laid-type paper. Kuhler was one of the best known industrial designers of the American railroads. He learned etching after World War I and enrolled at the Academy of Art in Düsseldorf.


Arch of Septimus Severus
1894-1976, German-American

Etching, image size 7 3/4 x 5 3/8 inches, pencil signed.


Heavy Weather
1894-1976, German-American

Etching, image size 12 3/4 x 9 1/4 inches, titled and signed in pencil


At Quarantine
1894-1976, German-American

Etching, image size 10 3/8 x 7 3/4 inches, signed and titled in pencil


The Thomas W. Koon Dam, Cumberland, Maryland
1894-1976, German-American

Etching, image size 7 3/4 x 10 3/8 inches, 1931, pencil signed and inscribed "No 38"

Painting

The Old Mill
1833-1894, American

This is a lush, finely detailed landscape by Henry W. Kemper, painted in 1865, signed and dated on the lower left corner. Oil on canvas, 16 x 14 inches, in the original period gilt frame. Kemper paints a very peaceful image of this long forgotten mill. In this verdant summer scene, a traveler approaches the mill from the darkness of the forest just as the sun peeks through passing storm clouds.

Print

Reflected Birches
1888-1954, American

Etching, image size: 9 3/16 x 7 1/4 inches, pencil signed lower right

Drawing

Dover Market
1915-2010, Lithuanian-American

This pencil drawing by Jack Levine measures 5 1/2 x 5 inches. It is pencil signed on the lower right. Levine was best known for his satires on modern life and political corruption. Born in South Boston into a large family, his drawing abilities were apparent at an young age. At 14 he entered a painting program at Harvard and a few years later was employed in the Works Progress Administration. His lower class childhood was often a subject of his paintings and he became known for "telling it like it is".