Kenneth Lauder
1916-2004, British

Cambrians
1916-2004, British

Watercolor, sight size 5 1/8 x 9 1/8 inches, 1972, signed by the artist l.r., identified on labels from Ruskin Gallery, Stratford-on-Avon, England, affixed to their backings. Cambrians is a largely unspoiled area of Mid Wales. Lauder painted in the minimalist style of watercolor stating that "the scale of the work is appropriate to the medium of water color, for within this compass extreme subtleties can be made. What was anticipated in a painting was the "unseen", the "unexpected". (M)

Painting

Cambrians
1916-2004, British

Watercolor, sight size 5 1/8 x 9 1/8 inches, 1972, signed by the artist l.r., identified on labels from Ruskin Gallery, Stratford-on-Avon, England, affixed to their backings. Cambrians is a largely unspoiled area of Mid Wales. Lauder painted in the minimalist style of watercolor stating that "the scale of the work is appropriate to the medium of water color, for within this compass extreme subtleties can be made. What was anticipated in a painting was the "unseen", the "unexpected". (M)

Print

Two Girls in Party Hats
1907-1973, American

Lithograph, image size 13 3/16 x 9 7/16 inches, c. 1945, Bengtz immigrated to America in 1927 and attended the school of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. During World War II, the Raytheon Corporation hired Bengtz as a technical illustrator of radar equipment. His drawings were so exacting that they looked like photographs. In the 1930’s Bengtz headed the drawing and graphic arts departments at the school of the Museum of Fine Arts. He was a well known and respected teacher spending many hours of his personal time helping his students.

Drawing

Dover Market
1915-2010, Lithuanian-American

This pencil drawing by Jack Levine measures 5 1/2 x 5 inches. It is pencil signed on the lower right. Levine was best known for his satires on modern life and political corruption. Born in South Boston into a large family, his drawing abilities were apparent at an young age. At 14 he entered a painting program at Harvard and a few years later was employed in the Works Progress Administration. His lower class childhood was often a subject of his paintings and he became known for "telling it like it is".