William Bicknell
1860-1947, American

Presentation Piece for B.P.O.E.
1860-1947, American

This etching by William Bicknell measures 13 3/4 x 16 1/2 inches. It is plate signed and dated on the lower margin and was given to individual donors who wanted to further the Elks’ purposes and ideals.


On the Abegona
1860-1947, American

Etching, image size 6 5/8 x 8 1/2 inches, 1895, pencil signed, plate signed, dated and titled.


Winter Landscape
1860-1947, American

Etching, image size 8 3/4 x 6 3/4 inches, 1919, pencil signed and plate signed.


Portrait of a Young Man
1860-1947, American

Etching, 4 x 3 in, pencil signed


Portrait of a Young Man
1860-1947, American

Etching, 4 x 3 in, plate signed


Portrait of Eugene Field
1860-1947, American

Etching, image size 3 3/4 x 2 1/2 in, proof before letters, pencil signed


Portrait of a Man in an Oval
1860-1947, American

Etching, 4 5/8 x 3 1/2, pencil signed


Country Couple
1860-1947, American

Etching, 4 1/2 x 3 in, plate signed


Portrait of a Man
1860-1947, American

Etching, 4 1/8 x 3 7/16 in, plate signed


Portrait of Man with Headcovering
1860-1947, American

Etching, 3 1/8 x 2 in, unsigned


Friar and Peasant
1860-1947, American

Etching, 5 1/8 x 3 5/8 in, plate signed


Portrait of a Woman
1860-1947, American

Etching, 4 3/8 x 3 1/4 in, plate signed


Lady with Mantle and Throne
1860-1947, American

Etching, 5 1/2 x 3 1/2 in, plate signed


Paying Last Respects
1860-1947, American

Etching, image size 4 1/4 x 3 1/8 in, plate signed


Music Lesson
1860-1947, American

Etching after W.I. Taylor, image size 5 x 3 3/8 in, plate signed


Daule and Beatrice
1860-1947, American

Etching after Alma Tadema, image size 4 1/8 x 5 15/16 in, plate signed


Charles Dickens
1860-1947, American

Etching after W.P. Frith, 4 3/8 x 3 1/2, 1910, pencil signed


Portrait
1860-1947, American

Etching, image size 10 5/8 x 8 5/16 inches, plate signed


Village Scene
1860-1947, American

etching, image size: 8 X 10 7/8", pencil signed.


Portrait Of Young Charles Dickens
1860-1947, American

etching,2 1/2X2 3/4",1907,pencil signed


Portrait Of Thomas Gray
1860-1947, American

etching,1899,2 1/2X3 3/4",pencil signed


Portrait Of Thomas Carlyle
1860-1947, American

etching,3 1/2X4",pencil signed,1898


Portrait Of Major Andre
1860-1947, American

etching,3 3/4X5",pencil signed


Portrait Of John Fiske
1860-1947, American

3 1/2X4 1/2",pencil signed


Portrait Of Frank Stockton
1860-1947, American

etching,2 1/2X3 1/2",pencil signed


Portrait Of Eugene Sue
1860-1947, American

etching,3 3/4X6",pencil signed


Portrait Of Dante Gabriel Rosetti
1860-1947, American

etching,3 1/2X4 3/4",pencil signed


Portrait Of Boyard Taylor
1860-1947, American

etching,4 1/4X5",pencil signed


Portrait Of Bocaccio
1860-1947, American

etching,3 1/2X4 3/4",pencil signed

Painting

Running Before the Gale
1879-1967, American

This is a stunning painting by noted American marine artist Frank Vining Smith (1879-1967). This dramatic scene of a ship with foul weather rigging is painted in oils on canvas and measures 36 x 42 inches, painted c. 1930. It is signed by the artist in the lower right corner and comes in a very fine modern gilt frame. Frank Vining Smith was born and raised on Cape Cod Massachusetts and had a strong affinity with the ocean from a very young age. He studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston under Frank Benson, Philip Hale and Edward C.

Print

Cape End Dune
1903-1992, American

Lithograph, image size 8 x 13 inches, 1940, edition of 25, pencil signed, dated, titled and numbered. John Gregory was a Provincetown artist, specializing in images of the Cape Cod landscape.

Drawing

Dover Market
1915-2010, Lithuanian-American

This pencil drawing by Jack Levine measures 5 1/2 x 5 inches. It is pencil signed on the lower right. Levine was best known for his satires on modern life and political corruption. Born in South Boston into a large family, his drawing abilities were apparent at an young age. At 14 he entered a painting program at Harvard and a few years later was employed in the Works Progress Administration. His lower class childhood was often a subject of his paintings and he became known for "telling it like it is".