John A. S. Monks
1850-1917, American

The Patriarch
1850-1917, American

This is a very fine original etching by Massachusetts artist John Austin Sands Monks. The image size is 13 5/8 x 12 5/8 inches, 1885, pencil signed. Monks studied etching with George Cass and painting with George Inness, becoming well known for his New England landscapes and images of sheep.


Herd Returning Home
1850-1917, American

This is an atmospheric original etching of a herd of sheep by American artist John Austin Sands Monks. Image size 11 x 16 1/2 inches, c. 1880s, shepherd's crook remarque in the lower right corner, pencil signed. A rich impression with beautiful plate tone and ample margins on Japan paper.


Twilight
1850-1917, American

Etching, image size 7 x 10 1/2 inches, 1883, cat: Tyler-67, plate signed and dated.


Towing the Barges
1850-1917, American

Etching, image size: 12 13/16 x 21 3/4 inches, 1886, pencil signed lower right


Sheep In The Snow
1850-1917, American

etching, 1886, 3 1/4x6 1/4, plate signed


Feeding the Sheep
1850-1917, American

Etching, 4 3/4 x 8 1/4, plate signed

Painting

Lake Thun, Switzerland
1872-1943, American

A beautiful watercolor with gouache by the Rhode Island artist Hezekiah Anthony Dyer, measuring 15 1/2 x 11 5/8 inches and signed on the l.l. Providence, Rhode Island label included. After extensively studying and traveling in Europe to refine his watercolor technique, Dyer returned to the US and entered the Rhode Island School of Design and eventually earned an Honorary Master of Arts Degree from Brown University. Known for his European landscapes and seascapes, Dyer was one of the founders of the Providence Watercolor Society.

Print

Windmill by the River
$145.00
1853-1927, European

Etching, image size 7 3/8 x 9 3/4 inches, 1907, pencil signed.

Drawing

Dover Market
1915-2010, Lithuanian-American

This pencil drawing by Jack Levine measures 5 1/2 x 5 inches. It is pencil signed on the lower right. Levine was best known for his satires on modern life and political corruption. Born in South Boston into a large family, his drawing abilities were apparent at an young age. At 14 he entered a painting program at Harvard and a few years later was employed in the Works Progress Administration. His lower class childhood was often a subject of his paintings and he became known for "telling it like it is".