John A. S. Monks
1850-1917, American

The Patriarch
1850-1917, American

This is a very fine original etching by Massachusetts artist John Austin Sands Monks. The image size is 13 5/8 x 12 5/8 inches, 1885, pencil signed. Monks studied etching with George Cass and painting with George Inness, becoming well known for his New England landscapes and images of sheep.


Herd Returning Home
1850-1917, American

This is an atmospheric original etching of a herd of sheep by American artist John Austin Sands Monks. Image size 11 x 16 1/2 inches, c. 1880s, shepherd's crook remarque in the lower right corner, pencil signed. A rich impression with beautiful plate tone and ample margins on Japan paper.


Twilight
1850-1917, American

Etching, image size 7 x 10 1/2 inches, 1883, cat: Tyler-67, plate signed and dated.


Towing the Barges
1850-1917, American

Etching, image size: 12 13/16 x 21 3/4 inches, 1886, pencil signed lower right


Sheep In The Snow
1850-1917, American

etching, 1886, 3 1/4x6 1/4, plate signed


Feeding the Sheep
1850-1917, American

Etching, 4 3/4 x 8 1/4, plate signed

Painting

Locked In
1830-1902, German

A lovely oil on canvas depicting children playing war games. Unsigned, canvas size measures 10 x 7 7/8 inches and is housed in a period gilt frame measuring 13 1/2 x 11 3/4 inches.

Print

The West Front, Rouen Cathedral
1857-1926, American

This is a very atmospheric etching of the scaffolding and facade of Rouen Cathedral in France. Image size 10 7/8 x 8 3/8 inches, 1907, edition of 90, cat: Wuerth-470, pencil signed "JPennell imp", the 'imp' indicating that Pennell printed this image himself. A richly inked impression with beautiful plate tone.

Drawing

Dover Market
1915-2010, Lithuanian-American

This pencil drawing by Jack Levine measures 5 1/2 x 5 inches. It is pencil signed on the lower right. Levine was best known for his satires on modern life and political corruption. Born in South Boston into a large family, his drawing abilities were apparent at an young age. At 14 he entered a painting program at Harvard and a few years later was employed in the Works Progress Administration. His lower class childhood was often a subject of his paintings and he became known for "telling it like it is".