Jean Louis Forain
1852-1931, French

La Lecture Du Dossierr
1852-1931, French

Etching, image size: 10 3/4 x 8 1/2 inches, 1909, cat. Guerin-53, inscribed 1st etat, pencil signed lower right


Croquis de femme nue, la tete contre l'oreiller
1852-1931, French

Etching with drypoint, image size 11 1/2 x 13 3/16 inches, first plate (Guerin 69), pencil signed and titled


Le Christ portant sa Croix (4e Planche)
1852-1931, French

Etching, image size: 11 1/2 x 15 1/8 inches, first state, (Faxon 116) pencil signed l.r.


Le Bouquet
1852-1931, French

Etching, image size: 4 3/4 x 6 1/4 inches, c. 1876, signed in plate, probably a late or posthumous impression (Faxon - 6)


Le Baiser du Drapeau
1852-1931, French

Lithograph, image size: 12 1/2 x 10 inches, 1919, edition 30/45, pencil signed and dated


En Greece
1852-1931, French

Lithograph, image size: 11 x 16 1/2 inches, edition of 100, signed in ink


Le Noeud de Cravate
1852-1931, French

Etching, image size 5 3/4 x 3 3/4 in, from CROQUIS PARISIENS, 1880, possibly a later printing (Faxon, 20), pencil signed


L'Imploration devant la grotte, Lordes
1852-1931, French

Etching, image size 10 1/2 x 7 3/4, third plate - first state, circa 1900, pencil signed

Painting

Cutty Sark
1879-1967, American

This highly detailed painting of the clipper ship "Cutty Sark" is by noted American marine artist Frank Vining Smith (1879-1967). An oil on canvas created around 1930, it measures 30 x 40 inches and is signed by the artist in the lower right corner. This ship was one of the last tea clippers to be built and one of the fastest, holding the record time from Australia to Britain for a period of ten years. The name refers to the witch "Nannie Dee" in Robert Burns 1791 poem "Tam o'Shanter" and she is represented as the ships figurehead in a white "cutty sark" or short nightgown.

Print

A Shepherd and His Flock
1838-1888, Dutch

Etching after A. Mauve, image size: 6 1/2 x 10 1/8 inches, pencil signed indistinctly

Drawing

Bringing Home the Flock
1875-1909, American,N.Y.

Pastel on board, 9 x 12 inches, c. 1900, signed, in the original frame.