Lithographs

Junk Shop

Julius Tanzer's lithograph "Junk Shop" measures 14 x 10 1/2 inches and is pencil signed and titled on the lower margin. Tanzer was an artist for the Works Project Administration in New York. His remarkable lithographs depict the grit and beauty of everyday life in Depression era New York City. Many of his prints are included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Entree de la rue du Bazar a Ste. Jean d'Acre

This framed lithograph by Engelmann after Vernet, measures 17 x 10 3/4 inches. It is plate signed and titled on the lower margin. Godefroy Engelmann was born in 1788 in Mühlhausen, France and trained in Switzerland and France at La Rochelle and Bordeaux. He studied painting and sketching in Jean-Baptiste Regnault’s atelier in Paris. In the summer of 1814 he traveled to Munich, Germany to study lithography and is largely credited with bringing lithography to France.

Riverside Bungalows

This lithograph by Dexter Dawes measures 11 x 14 3/4 inches and is pencil signed. Dawes was born in Englewood, NJ and went on to study at New York City's Art Student League. He summered in Marlboro, NH surrounded by beautiful gardens with views of Mount Monadnock which became the inspiration for many of his lithographs and paintings. He belonged to a number of associations including the National Arts Club.

Old Lyme, CT

This lithograph of the First Congregational Church in Old Lyme measures 12 3/4 x 17 inches. It is pencil signed on the lower margin. Dawes was born in Englewood, NJ and went on to study at New York City's Art Student League. He summered in Marlboro, NH surrounded by beautiful gardens with views of Mount Monadnock which became the inspiration for many of his lithographs and paintings. He belonged to a number of associations including the National Arts Club.

Zeppelin Over the Washington Bridge

This lithograph by Dexter Dawes measures 11 7/8 x 14 5/8 inches and is pencil signed by the artist. This is one in a series of lithographs of the construction of the George Washington Bridge that Dawes created between 1927 and bridges’ completion in 1931. This suspension bridge would eventually connect Ft. Lee, NJ to Manhattan across the Hudson River. Swiss born engineer Othmar Amman made this gigantic structure look "light and airy" with its miles of intertwined steel cable.

Washington Bridge Tower

This lithograph by Dexter Dawes measures 11 5/8 x 15 1/4 inches, one in a series of lithographs of the construction of the George Washington Bridge that Dawes created between 1927 and the bridges' completion in 1931. This suspension bridge would eventually connect Ft. Lee, NJ to Manhattan across the Hudson River. Swiss born engineer Othmar Amman made this gigantic structure look "light and airy" with its miles of intertwined steel cable. Considered by some to be the noblest of bridges it became a symbol of the art and craft of the civil engineering profession.

The Future Boulevard

This lithograph of the George Washington Bridge under construction by Dexter Dawes measures 11 x 17 inches and is pencil signed on the lower right margin. This is one in a series of lithographs of the construction of the George Washington Bridge that Dawes created between 1927 and the bridges' completion in 1931. This suspension bridge would eventually connect Ft. Lee, NJ to Manhattan across the Hudson River. Swiss born engineer Othmar Amman made this gigantic structure look "light and airy" with its miles of intertwined steel cable.

The Empire State Building

Dexter Dawes lithograph titled "The Empire State Building" viewed from across the Hudson River measures 15 x 12 inches and is pencil signed on the lower margin. Dawes was born in Englewood, NJ and went on to study at New York City's Art Student League. He summered in Marlboro, NH surrounded by beautiful gardens with views of Mount Monadnock which became the inspiration for many of his lithographs and paintings. He belonged to a number of associations including the National Arts Club.

Looking West

"Looking West" by Dexter Dawes measures 12 x 14 3/4 inches and is pencil signed by the artist on the lower margin. Dawes was born in Englewood, NJ and went on to study at New York City's Art Student League. He summered in Marlboro, NH surrounded by beautiful gardens with views of Mount Monadnock which became the inspiration for many of his lithographs and paintings. He belonged to a number of associations including the National Arts Club.

George Washington Bridge Construction

This lithograph by Dexter Dawes measures 12 1/8 x 14 7/8 inches and is pencil signed by the artist. This is one in a series of lithographs of the construction of the George Washington Bridge that Dawes created between 1927 and the bridges' completion in 1931. This suspension bridge would eventually connect Ft. Lee, NJ to Manhattan across the Hudson River. Swiss born engineer Othmar Amman made this gigantic structure look "light and airy" with its miles of intertwined steel cable.

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