20th Century European Prints

Munter Und Kind

$725.00

A soft ground etching by German Expressionist artist Lovis Corinth, this image measures 12 1/2 x 9 3/8 inches, published in 1910 in an edition of 50 impressions, state I/III, cat: Schwarz-41,"LC" monogram in the upper left of the image, a faded signature below the image, framed. Corinth began his career studying at the Academy of Fine Arts Munich and went on to study under Bouguereau at the Academie Julian in Paris. He later returned to Germany and became a member and eventually president of the Berlin "Sezession." Corinth is best known for his prints and paintings of figures and portraits.

Windy Sleeves

$675.00

This 14 3/8 x 11 5/8 inches color etching is printed on thin Japan paper, edition of 100. Pencil signed and editioned. Provenance Arthur Ackerman & Son Inc., New York.

Elyse Lord lived her entire life in Britain and although her work shows a strong Asian influence, she never actually traveled the continent. Her inspiration instead came from Chinese literature, artwork and her own imagination. Her unique style uses fine drypoint lines and delicate, yet vibrant colors to create images that that have a serene, almost dreamlike quality. She was a member of the Society of Graver-Printers in Colour and the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours and showed her work in many exhibitions including at the Royal Academy, Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours, Royal Scottish Academy, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, and the Paris Salon.

Amiens Cathedral (Jour d'Inventaire)

$675.00

This beautiful 1907 etching with drypoint of "Inventory Day" by August-Louis Lepere measures 13 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches, in an edition of about 166, Saunier cat: 344, illlustrated in "Etchers and Etchings", Joseph Pennell, 1929, p. 199. Dated and signed in the plate and pencil signed, l.r., framed. Auguste-Louis Lepere was one of the leading French printmakers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He began studying printmaking at the age of 13 with Joseph Burn Smeeton in Paris and quickly made a name for himself with his innovative style and technically brilliant etchings and wood engravings.

Bathers

$675.00

This wood engraving by John Buckland Wright measures 5 1/4 x 7 inches, published in 1917 in an edition of 30. It is pencil signed, dated and numbered on the lower margin. Wright help to found "Atelier 17" in Paris, an experimental workshop for the graphic arts in 1927.

Brixham Trawlers

$675.00

"Brixham Trawlers" by Arthur Briscoe measures 5 3/8 x 13 7/8 inches, published in 1929 in an edition of 75. Printed in sepia toned ink on Whatman laid paper, it is ink signed and numbered and also plate signed, dated and titled. Briscoe is known as the finest marine etcher of the 20th. century. He owned his own three ton cutter which he used to sail around the Essex coast. Also crewing on a Polish ship, he sketched every aspect of life on the boat. He studied at the Slade Art School and the Academy Julian in Paris. His name became internationally renowned when his works sold to the New York market.

St. Martin's Bridge

$675.00

This richly inked etching of St. Martin's Bridge near Toledo, Spain, by Sir Frank Brangwyn, measures 19 3/4 x 23 3/4 inches, pencil signed, 1923, printed in two color ink, black and brown. Sir Frank Brangwyn was one of the most important British artists of the early 20th century. A member of the Royal Academy, the Royal Watercolor Society, and the Royal Society of British Artists, he was knighted in 1924.

Vienna Opera House

$675.00

This color aquatint by Luigi Kasimir measures 17 3/4 x 15 inches, pencil signed, plate dated, 1922, cat: Lorenz-6, framed. Luigi Kasimir studied at the Vienna Academy of Art, although much of his etching technique was self taught and learned through working from nature. Kasimir traveled all over Europe and the United States creating many spectacular architectural etchings.

Rotherhithe

$675.00

This 1921 original etching by the British artist, Ernest Lumsden, measures 14 3/8 x 8 1/2 inches, pencil signed, dated in the plate, 1921. Rotherhithe, meaning "a mariner's haven", in southeast London, was the first place that docks were constructed for the convenience of the Londoners.

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